Project Listing

MRBA Water Quality Monitoring Program

Missisquoi River Basin Association (MRBA) maintains a volunteer program to test the river water quality. The volunteers started in 2005 sampling phosphorous, turbidity, and nitrogen levels along the length of the Missisquoi River. Since 2005, the volunteers have collected over 7,000 samples. The sites stretch over 90 miles long and include both sides of the Green Mountain chain. The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation sponsors the water quality testing and has the samples analyzed at The University of Vermont’s LaRosa Lab.

Missisquoi River Basin Association Tree Planting Program

The Missisquoi River Basin Association (MRBA), got its start in 1994 with the determination and dedication to restore the Missisquoi River watershed. The MRBA is a group comprised of teachers, farmers, business owners, environmental experts and concerned citizens. Since the formation, the non-profit has planted more than 22,000 trees to create streambank buffers and provide habitat alongside the Missisquoi River.

Conservation of Zack Woods

Zack Woods is a unique 393 acre area containing 9 undeveloped shoreline ponds, including Zack Woods Pond, Perch Pond, and a third of the shoreline of Mud Pond. Zack Woods Pond is one of the top 9 lakes in Vermont, ranked the highest for wilderness-like character. Zack Woods Pond has been a nesting location for the Common Loon since 1996, due to its unique natural island. The land is a popular destination for hiking, running, skiing, and snowshoeing. The ponds are a destination for swimming, paddling, and fishing.

Conservation of Zack Woods

Zack Woods is a unique 393 acre area containing 9 undeveloped shoreline ponds, including Zack Woods Pond, Perch Pond, and a third of the shoreline of Mud Pond. Zack Woods Pond is one of the top 9 lakes in Vermont, ranked the highest for wilderness-like character. Zack Woods Pond has been a nesting location for the Common Loon since 1996, due to its unique natural island. The land is a popular destination for hiking, running, skiing, and snowshoeing. The ponds are a destination for swimming, paddling, and fishing.

The Creation of the Lowell Community Nature Trail

In Lowell, VT, a student at the Lowell Graded School named AJ Sicotte had a growing interest in building a walking trail through the woods behind his school that would be open to the entire town. After beginning clearing the trail himself, AJ gained help from the community when Bob Hawk, the linkage coordinator for the Staying Connected Initiative (SCI) met with the Lowell School principal, Scott Boskind, and two teachers from the school’s science department, Judy Ide and Michael Brooks.

Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB) Caledonia County Investments

Since the establishment of the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB) in 1987, the organization has funded the conservation of over 5,000 acres of land in Caledonia County, Vermont. This land involved the investment of more than $10.5 million by the VHCB and over $32 million in federal funds. This funding allowed many of the towns within Caledonia County to perform conservation work.

Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB)

The Vermont Housing and Conservation Board (VHCB) was established in 1987, via legislation, as a funding mechanism for conservation land deals. The VHCB originally operated using money from VHCB trust funds matched with federal funds. However, the current funding for the VHCB comes from the Vermont state property transfer tax. This group funds land deals for recreation, farmland preservation, water quality protection, and many other conservation related uses.

Burke Natural Resources Overlay District

The creation of the Burke Natural Resources Overlay District stemmed from the purchase of a ski area in Burke, VT. This purchase caused great concern for the scenic beauty of Burke’s mountains due to the lack of zoning regulations to protect the these mountain tops from heavy development. In order to protect the scenic beauty of Burke and to conserve its mountain tops, the Scenic and Conservation Overlay district was created.

Arrowwood Inventory of Fayston, Warren, and Waitsfield: Natural Community Mapping

The Arrowwood Inventory of Fayston, Warren, and Waitsfield began when these towns were awarded a Municipal Planning Grant from the Vermont Agency of Commerce and Community Development. This grant led to the hire of Arrowwood Environmental to create inventories of the natural communities in these three towns. These inventories involved identifying, assessing, and ranking wildlife habitat, upland and wetland natural communities, vernal pools, connecting lands, and rare elements.

Stewardship of the Urban Landscape (SOUL) Tree Stewards Training

Beginning in 1996, Vermont Urban and Community Forestry began offering a course referred to as S.O.U.L Stewards training. This course is currently offered to the public with the goal of empowering citizens to become advocates of urban forests. Citizens that take the course are educated on policy, tree biology, and the principles of urban forestry, such as pruning. Additionally, this course helps to teach and develop leadership skills in the field.

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